Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

Reflection Photo

Chihuly art glass reflections in front of the Climatron geodesic dome at Missouri Botanical Garden. Photograph copyright, Leigh Ward-Smith, 2014.

Reflection Close-Up

Chihuly close-up. Photograph copyright, Leigh Ward-Smith, 2014.

For this weekly photo challenge, I am offering up these photographs from several years ago. They were taken on a somewhat windy day as you can see from the ripples in the pool. These large-scale, floating glass sculptures are by artist Dale Chihuly and were installed at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, Missouri. Glasstronomical sculptures, aren’t they? (Sorry, I couldn’t resist!) With or without an inspiring artistic installation, the Garden—also occasionally called MoBot—is a place to put on your travel itinerary should you ever visit the city that is perhaps best known for its Arch and dubbed “the gateway to the West.” Well, thanks for visiting my blog today; please drop by again anytime!

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8 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

    • Andy, thanks for asking that. It prompted me to do a little research. I should have included a link to Mr. Chihuly’s site in the orig. post, but I forgot. Apparently these floating bulb-like glass pieces are called Walla Wallas (presumably since the artist hails from the Washington State area). All that I can find is that they are called “small floating sculptures” (from an article about a Chihuly installation at the famous Kew Gardens in England:http://www.chihuly.com/chihuly-at-kew_detail.aspx). Mr. Chihuly’s site doesn’t seem to explain the sculptures any better than that (http://www.chihuly.com/walla-wallas-2006-missouri_detail.aspx). I couldn’t tell if they were anchored or free-floating; I feel like I remember them being in different locations on the waters at different times. I thought they were free, but my husband thinks anchored. I could see the logic of either. Interestingly, Chihuly had other floating sculptures, including at MoBot, that were spheres. He calls those Niijima floats and pods. Sorry I couldn’t answer your question better.

    • They are lovely, aren’t they? I like how (many of them I’ve seen) are very organic and really complement the landscape/environment where they’re installed. Thanks for stopping by & taking time to comment–all while trying to get a house ready to move (we’re kind of in that boat, too) and going through a really draconian-sounding testing ritual for your daughter. Good luck on both fronts!

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